My thoughts
libertarianmoney:

Libertarian Money is your source for daily libertarian leaning entertainment. Be sure to follow to keep up with all of the updates.
Repost for Liberty!

libertarianmoney:

Libertarian Money is your source for daily libertarian leaning entertainment. Be sure to follow to keep up with all of the updates.

Repost for Liberty!

gawki:

This is a pretty basic one, but that doesn’t make it any less important to know! I hope it helps.  …

e1n:

Had a class on inventing figures for animation by Rad Sechrist (Dreamworks) today. Here’s a few pages from my notes on breaking down head structure and tips on varying head sizes and shapes.  Some of these you might already know, but it’s still very useful to keep in mind while drawing.  

Also a tip on how to draw jawline when the character is looking upwards.  Most common mistake is in drawing the jawline facing at an angle above horizontal, because when heads look up, jawline is still either in line with the horizontal, or slightly below it.  The only time jawline point at an angle above horizon is when the character is looking up at an extreme angle (almost straight up!)

miniature:

i’m looking for a tumblr girlfriend to make FAMOUS! Following everyone back until I find one :)

miniature:

i’m looking for a tumblr girlfriend to make FAMOUS! Following everyone back until I find one :)

quoteofmylife-x:

"My nightmares are usually about losing you."
-Peeta Mellark, The Hunger Games

quoteofmylife-x:

"My nightmares are usually about losing you."

-Peeta Mellark, The Hunger Games

awesomedigitalart:

Hydra by Shinerai
neurosciencestuff:

A circuit for change
To answer the seemingly simple question “Have I been here before?” we must use our memories of previous experiences to determine if our current location is familiar or novel. In a new study published in the Journal of Neuroscience researchers from the RIKEN Brain Science Institute have identified a region of the hippocampus, called CA2, which is sensitive to even small changes in a familiar context. The results provide the first clue to the contributions of CA2 to memory and may help shed light on why this area is often found to be abnormal in the schizophrenic brain.

Change comes in many flavors; if we move to a new country, city or house it is easy to recognize the novelty of the environment, but if we come home to find the furniture rearranged or a new piece of art on the wall, this recognition may be much slower. Scientists believe this is because memory formation requires comparing current information with previous experience and the larger the overlap, the more difficult the distinction. It has long been known that the hippocampus is a region of the brain crucial for this type of memory, however the identification of neurons responsible for this comparison has remained elusive.
In this study Marie Wintzer, Roman Boehringer, Denis Polygalov and Thomas McHugh used genetically modified mice and advanced cell imaging techniques to demonstrate that while the entire hippocampus is capable of detecting large changes in context, the small and often overlooked CA2 region is exquisitely sensitive to small changes.
Mice were familiarized with one context and then placed either in a much different context or back in the original with small alterations, such as several new small objects. By detecting the expression of activity induced genes Wintzer and colleagues were able to demonstrate that just a few new objects in the otherwise unchanged context completely altered the pattern of active cells specifically in CA2. Mice that had been genetically engineered to lack this CA2 response explored the new context much less than their normal siblings.
“CA2 has often been overlooked or simply grouped together with its more prominent neighbors, but these data suggest it’s unique and important for recognizing and reacting to changes in our environments” explains Dr. McHugh, the leader of the study.
Compared to rodents, human CA2 is proportionally larger, but still as mysterious. One intriguing finding has been that early in the onset of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder there is a loss of inhibitory neurons specifically in CA2. In addition to the memory problems that accompany these diseases, patients often exhibit a hyper-sensitivity to changes in environment and routine. This study suggests there may be a functional relationship between this sensitivity and CA2 dysfunction, hinting at a new circuit to target in our attempts to understand the function of both the normal and diseased brain.

neurosciencestuff:

A circuit for change

To answer the seemingly simple question “Have I been here before?” we must use our memories of previous experiences to determine if our current location is familiar or novel. In a new study published in the Journal of Neuroscience researchers from the RIKEN Brain Science Institute have identified a region of the hippocampus, called CA2, which is sensitive to even small changes in a familiar context. The results provide the first clue to the contributions of CA2 to memory and may help shed light on why this area is often found to be abnormal in the schizophrenic brain.

Change comes in many flavors; if we move to a new country, city or house it is easy to recognize the novelty of the environment, but if we come home to find the furniture rearranged or a new piece of art on the wall, this recognition may be much slower. Scientists believe this is because memory formation requires comparing current information with previous experience and the larger the overlap, the more difficult the distinction. It has long been known that the hippocampus is a region of the brain crucial for this type of memory, however the identification of neurons responsible for this comparison has remained elusive.

In this study Marie Wintzer, Roman Boehringer, Denis Polygalov and Thomas McHugh used genetically modified mice and advanced cell imaging techniques to demonstrate that while the entire hippocampus is capable of detecting large changes in context, the small and often overlooked CA2 region is exquisitely sensitive to small changes.

Mice were familiarized with one context and then placed either in a much different context or back in the original with small alterations, such as several new small objects. By detecting the expression of activity induced genes Wintzer and colleagues were able to demonstrate that just a few new objects in the otherwise unchanged context completely altered the pattern of active cells specifically in CA2. Mice that had been genetically engineered to lack this CA2 response explored the new context much less than their normal siblings.

“CA2 has often been overlooked or simply grouped together with its more prominent neighbors, but these data suggest it’s unique and important for recognizing and reacting to changes in our environments” explains Dr. McHugh, the leader of the study.

Compared to rodents, human CA2 is proportionally larger, but still as mysterious. One intriguing finding has been that early in the onset of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder there is a loss of inhibitory neurons specifically in CA2. In addition to the memory problems that accompany these diseases, patients often exhibit a hyper-sensitivity to changes in environment and routine. This study suggests there may be a functional relationship between this sensitivity and CA2 dysfunction, hinting at a new circuit to target in our attempts to understand the function of both the normal and diseased brain.